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Motorcyclist Killed in Oklahoma City Construction Zone Accident

By on November 24, 2017 | Posted in: Motorcycle Accident

city-1907536_1920A fatal motorcycle crash was recently reported in Oklahoma City. A 48-year-old man was driving a Harley-Davidson motorcycle on I-235 approaching a construction work zone. He apparently slowed down and was hit in the rear by a Chevrolet. The man, who was not wearing a helmet, died at the scene. Investigators are still reviewing the details of the collision.

Motorcycle Deaths in the U.S.

The Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) estimated that motorcycle fatalities rose 10% in 2015, totaling slightly over 5,000. Only 16 states in 2015 experienced an overall decrease in such fatalities.

Many experts say that the prolonged warmer weather during the year allowed for more overall motorcycle riding.

It is no secret that a motorcycle is a dangerous mode of transportation. Other factors that increase your chances of injury include not wearing a helmet, alcohol consumption, and lack of training. Upon impact with much heavier vehicles, motorcyclists are exposed to potentially catastrophic injuries. Many accidents come about simply because drivers didn’t see the motorcycles to begin with.

Motorcycle Deaths in Oklahoma

There were 89 motorcycle fatalities across the state in 2015, a slight decrease from the prior year. Of those fatalities, 62 riders were not wearing a helmet.

Oklahoma requires riders under 18 years old to wear a helmet. The state did have a universal helmet law in place in the 1960s; however, it was repealed, making helmet-wearing only a requirement for minors in 1976. As of 2016, minors must also complete an approved course for operating a motorcycle.

Motorcycle Safety Initiatives in Oklahoma

The Oklahoma Motorcycle Advisory Committee for Safety & Education is responsible for funding approval on motorcycle safety programs. The state remains committed to motorcycle safety in various programs, such as the following:

  • DPS Motorcycle Education and Quality Assurance Program: The Department of Public Safety monitors the approximately 78 Motorcycle Safety Foundation-approved motorcycle instructors, who operate out of 11 locations.
  • The Oklahoma Safety Office continues to pursue grant funding and plans to place more emphasis on reducing crashes among riders over the age of 45.
  • The Southern OK Tech Center provides Basic and Advanced Rider courses, which consist of both classroom instruction and on-range riding.

Across Oklahoma there is continued progress to enhance roadway safety; however, there are still far too many motorcycle-related injuries and fatalities that occur from distracted driving, speeding, and driving under the influence.

If you need information after a motorcycle accident, reach out to Car Accident Help. We understand that crashes can leave riders with severe injuries and other concerns such as medical expenses, rehabilitative costs, and missed work. For a free consultation, contact us today at (405) 285-4357.

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Motorcyclist Killed in Oklahoma City Construction Zone Accident

city-1907536_1920A fatal motorcycle crash was recently reported in Oklahoma City. A 48-year-old man was driving a Harley-Davidson motorcycle on I-235 approaching a construction work zone. He apparently slowed down and was hit in the rear by a Chevrolet. The man, who was not wearing a helmet, died at the scene. Investigators are still reviewing the details of the collision.

Motorcycle Deaths in the U.S.

The Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) estimated that motorcycle fatalities rose 10% in 2015, totaling slightly over 5,000. Only 16 states in 2015 experienced an overall decrease in such fatalities.

Many experts say that the prolonged warmer weather during the year allowed for more overall motorcycle riding.

It is no secret that a motorcycle is a dangerous mode of transportation. Other factors that increase your chances of injury include not wearing a helmet, alcohol consumption, and lack of training. Upon impact with much heavier vehicles, motorcyclists are exposed to potentially catastrophic injuries. Many accidents come about simply because drivers didn’t see the motorcycles to begin with.

Motorcycle Deaths in Oklahoma

There were 89 motorcycle fatalities across the state in 2015, a slight decrease from the prior year. Of those fatalities, 62 riders were not wearing a helmet.

Oklahoma requires riders under 18 years old to wear a helmet. The state did have a universal helmet law in place in the 1960s; however, it was repealed, making helmet-wearing only a requirement for minors in 1976. As of 2016, minors must also complete an approved course for operating a motorcycle.

Motorcycle Safety Initiatives in Oklahoma

The Oklahoma Motorcycle Advisory Committee for Safety & Education is responsible for funding approval on motorcycle safety programs. The state remains committed to motorcycle safety in various programs, such as the following:

  • DPS Motorcycle Education and Quality Assurance Program: The Department of Public Safety monitors the approximately 78 Motorcycle Safety Foundation-approved motorcycle instructors, who operate out of 11 locations.
  • The Oklahoma Safety Office continues to pursue grant funding and plans to place more emphasis on reducing crashes among riders over the age of 45.
  • The Southern OK Tech Center provides Basic and Advanced Rider courses, which consist of both classroom instruction and on-range riding.

Across Oklahoma there is continued progress to enhance roadway safety; however, there are still far too many motorcycle-related injuries and fatalities that occur from distracted driving, speeding, and driving under the influence.

If you need information after a motorcycle accident, reach out to Car Accident Help. We understand that crashes can leave riders with severe injuries and other concerns such as medical expenses, rehabilitative costs, and missed work. For a free consultation, contact us today at (405) 285-4357.

Related Articles:

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